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ArcticThunder

Strange Animals on Earth

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On 2/29/2020 at 11:21 PM, ArcticThunder said:

Humming Bird Moth By Beatriz Moisset

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Quite often inexperienced garden visitors notice what they think is a tiny hummingbird fleeting among flowers such as bee balm (Monarda). They listen incredulously when one explains to them that what they just saw was not a bird but a moth. Hummingbird moths are rather plump; the tip of their tail opens into a fan.

We get a lot of those near where I live! They are incredible!

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On 6/10/2020 at 4:57 AM, Juan147 said:

Shoebill Bird

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It is a very impressive bird, that reaches a height of 1.2 meters approximately, they are sedentary and solitary, rarely they usually walk accompanied by another bird of their species, for this reason their reproduction is difficult.

Source: https://rare-animals.com/

As someone who suffers with ornithophobia this is actually terrifying! Wouldn’t want to meet that any time soon! Scary!!!

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Its beak is larger then its head. I did some time with the SPCA and I rescued all manner of birds. I had to get right up close in personal with various birds, owls, Blue Heron, hawks. But it was the small little blue Jay that gave me the most grief. It really did.

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3 minutes ago, ArcticThunder said:

Its beak is larger then its head. I did some time with the SPCA and I rescued all manner of birds. I had to get right up close in personal with various birds, owls, Blue Heron, hawks. But it was the small little blue Jay that gave me the most grief. It really did.

Wow really? We get sparrow hawks, kestrels, buzzards, Jays and all other small birds in our garden (UK). They are all beautiful just don’t like them flying to near to me or getting into my house!

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2 minutes ago, xTiffAngelx said:

Wow really? We get sparrow hawks, kestrels, buzzards, Jays and all other small birds in our garden (UK). They are all beautiful just don’t like them flying to near to me or getting into my house!

The blue Jays are so territorial. I was sent to pick up its mate. She had a broken wing and the male was dive bombing on everyone drawing close to its mate. I had to wear a hard hat and goggles but did managed to place the injured bird into a cage and then into the back of the truck. The male was still swooping down on me. I got in the truck and shut the windows. The crazy bird was swooping down on the truck and followed me for a short distance. Crazy bird. 

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Just now, ArcticThunder said:

The blue Jays are so territorial. I was sent to pick up its mate. She had a broken wing and the male was dive bombing on everyone drawing close to its mate. I had to wear a hard hat and goggles but did managed to place the injured bird into a cage and then into the back of the truck. The male was still swooping down on me. I got in the truck and shut the windows. The crazy bird was swooping down on the truck and followed me for a short distance. Crazy bird. 

That’s kind of nice though, in the fact that it was trying to defend its mate. I guess they must mate for life?

That situation sounds like my worse nightmare. Screams would be heard across the globe!!!

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1 minute ago, xTiffAngelx said:

That’s kind of nice though, in the fact that it was trying to defend its mate. I guess they must mate for life?

That situation sounds like my worse nightmare. Screams would be heard across the globe!!!

When it started chasing the truck I got a little disconcerted. Surely it can't fly faster then 50 miles per hour! Best left for Stephen King.

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Hammerhead bat.

I've heard recent talks that people may have confused this with the New Jersey Devil, but then again, how did a hammerhead bat get in NJ back in the day. Been planning on getting back to the Pine Barrens so I can do an overnight in there. Hubby keeps talking me out of it, lol.

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This is crazy. Top pix don't even look real. I can't judge its size but hell it looks like the New Jersey Devil. 

Gotta check this out. 👍

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Hammer-headed bat

The hammer-headed bat (Hypsignathus monstrosus), also known as hammer-headed fruit bat and big-lipped bat, is a megabatwidely distributed in West and Central Africa. It is the only member of the genus Hypsignathus, which is part of the tribe Epomophorini along with four other genera. It is the largest bat in continental Africa, with wingspans approaching 1 m, or about 3 ft, and males almost twice as heavy as females. 

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@Random Outdoor Fun I think that you might be onto something.

NEW JERSEY DEVIL

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Pretty much the same animal! 👍Thanks for sharing @Random Outdoor Fun

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1 hour ago, ArcticThunder said:

Now we just gotta figure out how it got here. Any suggestions?

Posted in your other thread 😉 I just have to see when side-shows/circus's were popular. Possible escapee of a side show, but worth delving in for sure! 🙂

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It's pretty scary looking! I'll stick with the polar bears. At least they look normal.🤣 By the way, these bats can carry the Ebola Virus.

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Haha oh this is my kind of topic! I love weird animals and i know loads of them!

 

This is a Lowland Streaked Tenrec, one of the weirdest and rarest species of tenrecs. They are native to the island of Madagascar and more specifically to the tropical lowland region in the Northern and Eastern parts of the island. They feed mainly on earthworms and though they have been sold in captivity, not a single person has ever manager to breed them succesfully in captivity. They are excellent swimmers! 

The quills on their backs are used for communication as the dorsal muscles (two parallel muscles from between the ears all the way to the hips) can be used to rub the quills against eachother to create a high frequency sound. They do this both to communicate between mother and young as well as to warn their predators.

Lowland_Streaked_Tenrec,_Mantadia,_Madagascar.jpg

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Heebie-Jeebies

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This centipede is the largest of its kind and grows up to eight, crazy long inches.

You can find these puppies in the deserts of the southwestern United States. I'll stick with exploring the western deserts via EWU and/or the Area 51 Rider videos (or any other of our videos from our members). Eight inches long!  There's something wrong with your desert.😁

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THORN BUG

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These thorn bugs are related to cicadas, and use their beaks to pierce plant stems to feed upon their sap. Scientists finds their strange appearance quite odd. 

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16 hours ago, ArcticThunder said:

THORN BUG

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These thorn bugs are related to cicadas, and use their beaks to pierce plant stems to feed upon their sap. Scientists finds their strange appearance quite odd. 

Wow, they really do look like a rose thorn, is there any particular plant they’re fond of? Just wondering if they have adapted to look like a rose thorn if they really liked roses...

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@xTiffAngelx that sounds like a pretty good guess. The article stated that the scientists were not sure to why they adapted this way. It seems like a great defensive adaptation to me. 

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Wow, that's pretty intrueging! I'm deff putting some.good research skills to use tomorrow, i wanna know lol!

Here's another one i have actually observes a lot while doing internships and animal care studies...

Naked mole-rat or sand puppy. They love in Eastern Africa and survive mostly Underground in very harsh environments. They are closely related to the Blesmole. Damaraland mole-rats and Naked mole-rats are the only eusocial mammals known on the entire planet, which is the highest classificatie of sociality. Meaning they're more social than a group of ants! Because they don't see any sunlight and live in complete darkness, these animals are both deaf and blind as any sound would echo through their caves and make them deaf anyway. They also don't communicatie by sound but by smell (they stink... Horribly, haha). They love in large groups in sandy tunnels, much like ants and have a similar hierarchy in regards to which mole carries good, which ones care for the offspring, which takes care of dead moles, etc. They're highly intelligent too and can adjust to any New given taks when another mole fietsmand needs to be replaced. They're fascinating little creatures!

Molrat.jpg

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Greater sage-grouse

This weird-looking bird is a male sage-grouse. His chest is adorned with large air sacs, which he uses to attract females by making them produce odd popping sounds. The males congregate in groups across the shrubland of western North America called “leks,” calling to females.

However, these fantastically bizarre birds are decreasing in number. One species is near-threatened, while the other is endangered and has only 1,700 adult birds left. Human use of their habitat has shrunk their population.

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